EvoHull Publications

[content_boxes layout=”icon-on-side” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”” circlebordercolor=”” backgroundcolor=””]

[content_box title=”Dr Bernd Haenfling” icon=”user” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?hl=en&user=rfJ3qhcAAAAJ” linktarget=”_blank” linktext=”Google Scholar citations” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″]Conservation genetics and genomics of freshwater fishes, eDNA and metabarcoding and the dynamics of biological invasions in freshwaters [/content_box]

[content_box title=”Dr Africa Gomez” icon=”user” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=oHzhVGwAAAAJ” linktarget=”_blank” linktext=”Google Scholar citations” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″]Population genetics, phylogeography and the evolution of reproductive modes [/content_box]

[/content_boxes]

[content_boxes layout=”icon-on-side” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”” circlebordercolor=”” backgroundcolor=””]

[content_box title=”Dr Domino Joyce” icon=”user” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=BIGSVc4AAAAJ” linktarget=”_blank” linktext=”Google Scholar citations” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″]Mechanisms shaping biodiversity, selection at individual loci, behavioural aspects of mate preference population divergence, and the genomic processes involved in adaptive radiations [/content_box]

[content_box title=”Dr Lori Lawson Handley” icon=”user” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?hl=en&q=lori+lawson+handley&btnG=&as_sdt=1%2C5&as_sdtp=” linktarget=”_blank” linktext=”Google Scholar citations” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″]The evolutionary causes and consequences of dispersal, and the factors driving the evolution of sex chromosomes [/content_box]

[/content_boxes]

[content_boxes layout=”icon-on-side” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”” circlebordercolor=”” backgroundcolor=””]

[content_box title=”Dr Dave Lunt” icon=”user” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=rAZT3w0AAAAJ” linktarget=”_blank” linktext=”Google Scholar citations” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″]Comparative genomics, large scale phylogenetics, molecular evolution, and population genetics. [/content_box]

[content_box title=”” icon=”user” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″  animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″][/content_box]

[/content_boxes]

EvoHull Pubmed feed

pubmed: (lunt dh[au]) or ((h...

NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(lunt dh[AU]) OR ((hanfling b[AU]) OR (Hänfling B[AU])) OR (Lawson Handley[Author]) OR ((Gomez A[Author]) AND Hull[Affiliation]) OR ((Joyce DA[Author]) AND Hull[Affiliation])

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central Related Articles

Quantifying mating success of territorial males and sneakers in a bower-building cichlid fish.

Sci Rep. 2017 01 27;7:41128

Authors: Magalhaes IS, Smith AM, Joyce DA

Abstract
The strategies and traits males evolve to mate with females are incredible in their diversity. Theory on the evolution of secondary sexual characters suggests that evolving any costly trait or strategy will pay off and stabilise in the population if it is advantageous compared to the alternative less costly strategy, but quantifying the relative success of the two can be difficult. In Lake Malawi, Africa, there are >200 species of cichlid fish in which the males form leks and spend several weeks per year building sand-castle "bowers" several times their size. We tested the idea that a less costly "sneaking" strategy could be successful by quantifying the mating success of bower-holding versus non-bower-holding males. We PIT-tagged every fish in a semi-natural experimental set-up and placed tag-readers on the side of bowers to determine which fish held a bower. We then genotyped the eggs removed from females' mouths to assign paternity of each egg. Broods were fathered by up to 3 different males. Although paternity was mostly assigned to males that held a bower, a small number of males who did not own a bower were more successful than some of those that did, indicating a role for an alternative strategy in these bower builders.

PMID: 28128313 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]